MLO and PTB amplitude and phase | Scripps CO2 Program

MLO and PTB amplitude and phase


Description

Observed peak-to-trough of amplitude and phase based on day of year of downward zero crossing of CO2 at Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N, orange dots, right axis) and Mauna Loa, Hawaii (19.5°N, blue dots, left axis) as measured by the Scripps CO2 program and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Monitoring Division.

PTB data are from NOAA (https://gml.noaa.gov/aftp/data/trace_gases/co2/in-situ/surface/brw/co2_brw_surface-insitu_1_ccgg_DailyData.txt) and MLO data are from the Scripps CO2 program

MLO data are from the Scripps CO2 program.

NOAA PTB data citation: dataset_citation: K.W. Thoning, A.M. Crotwell, and J.W. Mund (2021), Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Dry Air Mole Fractions from continuous measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, Barrow, Alaska, American Samoa and South Pole. 1973-2019, Version 2021-02 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Global Monitoring Laboratory (GML), Boulder, Colorado, USA https://doi.org/10.15138/yaf1-bk21 FTP path: ftp://aftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/data/greenhouse_gases/co2/in-situ/surface/


Usage Restrictions

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Please direct queries to Ralph Keeling (rkeeling@ucsd.edu)